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    SCHOOL HEALTH 

    HEAD LICE 

                                            

     Although head lice are a nuisance and can be difficult to control, lice do not spread disease and are not considered a public health or medical hazard.  Getting head lice also is not related to how clean or dirty a person is or how clean or dirty his/her environment is.  Head lice do not live on pets.  Likewise, pets do not play a role in the spread of head lice.  Head lice move by crawling and do not hop, jump, or fly.  Head lice are found worldwide and the most common age group affected by head lice is children ages 3-11.  Head lice are spread by direct contact with the hair of an infested person.  Head lice can also be spread less commonly by contact with clothing such as hats, scarves, and coats, or through personal items such as combs, brushes, and towels.   Here are some things you can do to control the spread of head lice in your home and family:

    ·         Do not share items such as hats, scarves, coats, sports uniforms or equipment such as helmets, hair ribbons, barrettes, combs, brushes, towels, stuffed animals, and pillows

    ·         Check family members frequently for complaints of itching or excessive scratching, especially at night – also pay attention to whether or not your children seem irritable or complain of difficulty sleeping – head lice are most active in the dark – children may also complain that they have a tickling feeling of something moving through their hair

    ·         Practice good hygiene measures

    ·         Avoid head-to-head contact of children during play, at slumber parties, at camps, or at sporting events

    ·         If you are aware that someone has had a recent lice infestation, avoid sharing personal items with that individual and having head-to-head contact with that individual

    ·         If you or a family member has had a recent infestation, vacuum the floor, furniture, and carpets thoroughly – machine wash and dry clothing, bed linens, stuffed animals, pillows and other washable items using hot water (at least 130 degrees F) and the high heat drying cycle – dry cleaning will also kill any nits (eggs) or remaining live lice

    ·         Non-washable items may be sealed in a plastic bag and stored away for 2 weeks

    CHECK YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY FREQUENTLY TO CONTROL THE SPREAD OF LICE IN YOUR COMMUNITY     

     
     
Last Modified on October 6, 2017